Add an HTML Sitemap to a WordPress Website

Here’s some easy to follow instructions on how to add an HTML sitemap to a WordPress website.

After scouring the web and nearly giving myself a headache I found a solution, so this will hopefully save others those near headaches.

I’ll ramble here a little to begin with, to make getting to the crux of the problem easier, but you’re welcome to just leap to the formula below.

You see, when you find the site that provides the code for a WordPress HTML sitemap, it gives all the information, but not quite all the information on how to implement it – this was the frustrating part.

So I was armed with the ‘plugin’ code and the ‘shortcode’ to activate the sitemap, but didn’t really get the installation instructions of: “Add the shortcode to the page(s) of your choice”. You see an HTML sitemap is a page alone, it shouldn’t be added to specific pages, it should usually be on a page called: sitmap.php/htm/html &c.

I wanted my sitemap to be linked from the footer of every page of the site.

So to start with you’ll need the ‘plugin’ code, which is courtesy of Angelo Mandato (credit at bottom of article); there’s 2 options: you can go to the installation page, where at the top right of the page there’s a big red button, or use the instructions below, which I’ve stated as being easier.

Being easier, I’d advise you to log-in to your WordPress Dashboard and click on ‘Plugins’ (left-hand menu), a little drop down menu reveals ‘Add New’ click here, on this page there’s a search box, type in ‘HTML Sitemap’ and click on ‘Search Plugins’. At the top of the list you’ll see: ‘HTML Page Sitemap’, version ‘1.1.1’ – click on install.

Okay, 1st of 3 jobs completed.

Now to create the interaction between the ‘plugin’ and the ‘shortcode’ which is [html-sitemap], you’ll firstly need to click on ‘Pages’ (in the left-hand menu) of your WordPress Dashboard, in the drop down menu you’ll need to click on ‘Add New’, this will create the new sitemap page. Where it asks for ‘title’ enter ‘Sitemap’, in the ‘content’ box you need to add your ‘shortcode’, which is [html-sitemap], make sure you use square brackets. Now because you don’t want this page in the main navigation, it is advisable to give it a parent, so in the ‘Page Attributes’ (right-hand menu), click on the ‘no parent’ drop down and put it under ‘Other Info’ or something similar, click on ‘publish page’.

Okay 2nd of 3 jobs done.

Now we need to get the sitemap visible on every page of the site. Back to the WordPress Dashboard, in the left-hand menu click on ‘Appearance’, the drop down menu offers the link ‘Editor’, click on this. In the right-hand menu of the new page all the ‘Templates’ are listed, go down till you find ‘Footer’ (footer.php), click on this and you’ll see the content of your site’s footer links. You will most likely have the following in the footer already: Powered by <>a href=”http://www.WordPress.org”>WordPress<>

Right after this add the following: | <>a href=”http://www.MYWEBSITE.com/sitemap” target=”_blank>Sitemap<>

Naturally change the ‘MYWEBSITE’ to your own website and the.com to.de,.nl or.co.uk. Click on the blue button ‘Update File’.

That’s it job 3 of 3 completed.

Go to your website, press the ‘F5’ key, you may have to do this twice (that’s computers for you), and in your footer you should now see your newly created link to your site’s HTML sitemap, click on the link to test it, and you should find a nicely laid out sitemap indexing all your site’s pages.

Now naturally you may want the sitemap to be more detailed, for this I will reference you back to Angelo’s site, where he explains this further, but for me I just needed a nice clear HTML sitemap and no further headaches.

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Building a Website? HTML or WordPress

As a web developer, I get asked this question all the time – which is better to use to build a website – WordPress or HTML?

Well, I’m here to tell you – that it depends..

There is no one right answer, because it depends on what you are looking to use it for, and what kind of website/webpages you are looking to build.

1) As a custom web programmer, I have many large web projects where WordPress would not be the best choice for the project. Most of these websites are custom built application systems that I work on and in these cases neither WordPress or HTML would be the proper solution. These custom projects require dynamic programming using PHP, ASP with custom mySQL, MSsql databases, etc.

2) If you are looking to build a typical business website and are familiar with HTML programming, you could create static HTML pages for your website, or you could hire a programmer to build them for you.

But if you are planning to add fresh content to your website on a regular basis, or include an ongoing blog on your site, which is the best way to keep Google interested in your website and indexing you for search engine/SEO results, then HTML can be tedious and time-consuming if you are building it yourself, or expensive if you are paying someone to make the changes for you.

3) And, most typical websites require some king of common functionality such as contact forms, Google maps, optin signup pages, etc. and unless you are experienced in programming these kinds of things, then WordPress is definitely a good choice.

For these kinds of needs, WordPress makes a great choice because there are so many plugins available that can assist with most of your common needs as mentioned above, all without you having to worry about programming them yourself.

4) And the other great advantage of WordPress is that there are so many design templates openly available that it can be much simpler for you to find a web design you like, without having to pay the expense of hiring a web designer.

5) Now, if you are looking to do a simple squeeze page or a single product sales page, HTML might make sense if you can program in it, as WordPress might be a bit more than is needed.

But, if convenience and ease of use are important to you and you want to try to create your website yourself, then I would definitely recommend that you give WordPress a try. And, if you do decide that you would prefer to hire someone to build it for you, there are many professionals versed in using WordPress that would be able to help you out.

So, tell me – what you you prefer? What are you using for your website needs? And do you have any horror stories to share about one way or the other?

Be sure to leave your comments here – so we can all learn from each other.

Until Next Time! Betty

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HTML – Beyond the Basic Page – The "A" Tag

In another article we learned the basic structure and code to create a simple web page. Several tags were introduced without much detail. Here for a quick review is a basic web page with each of the following words (tags) contained by brackets. is an opening tag and is a closing tag.

When you’re making web pages, sooner or later you’ll want to send your viewer to another page (or another part of the same page). Your tool to accomplish this is the tag. The basic tag includes:

1. the destination page

2. letters (or an image) for the user to click

3. an end tag.

This is what it looks like click here . All that is visible on the page is “click here”. When your visitor clicks on those words they will be sent to ‘pagetwo.html’.

You may need to study that a little because I know it can be confusing at first.

– the opening tag–

– the letters (or image) the user will click- ‘click here’

– the closing tag–

If you have a basic web page created, make a duplicate in the same folder (save it as two.html and put some other text between the body tags). Then create an a tag for it. If you don’t already have a basic page, copy the code (at the top) to notepad (or any simple word processor) and save it as one.html

OK, Here we go. Open one.html (not in the browser) in notepad (or any basic word processor).

Between the body tags (all on one line) put the following–

go to two

Then save this. Now when you open one.html (in the web browser), you will see the words “go to two”. When you click on those words, your new page (two.html) will open in the browser (if you didn’t put anything between the body tags it will be blank). Then if you click the browser ‘back’ button you’ll go back to page one.

Congratulations. Cool, huh. If it doesn’t work the first time, go back and study the code a little more. Every letter, quote and bracket must be included and in the right place.

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SEO HTML Checklist – 7 Musts For SEO Compliant HTML

HTML is a ‘mark-up language’ used to describe the content and layout of all web pages to browsers and search engines. Search engines send out spiders (or ‘bots’), which are automated tools used to crawl web pages. They read the HTML code for each web page they find and index it.

Although search engines aren’t aware which server side language you use or which CMS, they are aware of the mark-up and client side code (HTML, CSS and Javascript) that results, so it’s important that your HTML is well formatted for your pages to be discovered and understood correctly by search engines.

Follow these 7 tips to ensure your HTML is SEO compliant:

  1. Validity: HTML tags have an opening and closing part. If these tags are not formed properly or missing a closing tag, spiders (and potentially browsers) find it difficult to read the page, so be careful with your coding. Use a specialised code editor with built in validation, like the code view in Dreamweaver or Visual Studio. Once you’ve published your website to a public facing URL, use the W3C HTML Validator (search for ‘W3C HTML Validator’ in your favourite search engine) to run a test. Problems are listed and explained, so you can correct and retest them. Search engines aren’t too worried if you choose to use HTML or XHTML, so long as you specify the correct ‘doctype’ at the top of your document and it validates correctly. If you use a CMS or Blog software, you may be provided with a WYSIWYG editor. Whilst this can be useful for saving time, it can create poorly formed HTML, so it’s important to check and validate this.
  2. Accessibility: Web accessibility is about allowing people with disabilities to use your website by building your pages in such a way that users don’t have to be able to see images/videos or hear audio to digest the content. Automated spiders are currently unable to interpret visual and audio content, so by gearing your content up to be accessible, you’re helping search engines as well as users with disabilities. These tips will stand you in good stead (you can find more information about this in the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative guidelines):

    • Use the alt attribute to describe each image.
    • Use text that makes sense when read out of context – don’t use ‘click here.’
    • Use headings, lists, and consistent structure.
    • If using frames, use the noframes element and sensible titles.
    • Summarise graphs & charts or use the longdesc attribute.
    • Provide alternative content for Javascript, Flash and Java
  3. Content behind forms: Any content that can only be accessed by submitting a form may not be able to be accessed by search engines. If content can’t be found, it won’t be indexed, so provide an anchor link to all pages on your website where possible.
  4. Use CSS: The higher your code to content ratio, the harder it makes it for search engines to find your important content and give it the importance it deserves. The old fashioned table based layouts once used by web developers are less efficient than using CSS (cascading style sheets) to describe layout. Using CSS means the layout descriptions can be kept outside of the page in linked files, making the code for each page simpler, which in turn makes it easier for search engines to find the content it’s looking for, rather than a lot of unnecessary html tags.
  5. Heading tags: Heading tags (h1, h2, etc) allow visitors and search engines to better understand how the content should be organised in your website and what the most important phrases are. As a rule h1 tags should be used for the main page title, with lower h tags containing subtitles in a logical hierarchy. Using meaningful wording in headings, bold and emphasised text is important, as search engines generally give these phrases greater relative importance than standard text on a page.
  6. Links: As mentioned earlier, it is extremely important to use a descriptive phrase for the link text, rather than something arbitrary like ‘click here’. Search engines use this text to figure out what you’re linking to, so it’s imperative that this text describes the destination page. From an SEO point of view, this is particularly important when internally linking to pages within your website – you should use a keyword phrase that you wish to associate the destination page with. Anchor tags can have the attribute rel=”nofollow” specified, which instructs spiders not to follow these links, which can come in handy for duplicate content you don’t wish to be indexed or for adding to blog comments you don’t necessarily want to be associated with your website.
  7. Images and Alt Tags: As mentioned in the accessibility tips list, you should always include ‘alt’ tags to describe your images. This is good practice for usability and accessibility, but also essential for SEO. Without these, search engines don’t know what’s in your image. When using images as links, this is especially important, as your image is acting as link text. It’s also worth naming your images descriptively (the actual file name) so they can be found by search engines and generate additional traffic back to your website.
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The Importance of Valid HTML Code

Valid HTML code is very important because it helps accessibility in the ever growing platform and user agent market such as smart phones, tablet computers, the Android browser and more. It also helps show professionalism and good practice, aids debugging and future proofing.

Languages and Rules

Web pages are written in the language of HTML and the current version is HMTL 5. Every language has its own syntax and therefore every document written in the language of HTML is supposed to follow its official rules.

The rules set out define how the syntax can be used, what order the language can be written in and how it all fits together. For example, you will always start a web page with the opening HTML tag and finish with the closing HTML tag. Between these tags is the head tag and body tag. The body tag comes after the head tag.

The rules also specify how certain syntaxes work and shouldn’t work. In a HTML list you use a block level item, such as a “<div>” tag, as a list item.

What is valid HTML code?

Valid code is HTML code that follows these rules set out by the W3C is dubbed “valid code”. This is because the code is properly formatted, based on standards created by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Any code that is not properly formatted is dubbed invalid code. Invalid code can be a result of typing mistakes or HTML code that was once valid but now obsolete. For example the “<b>” tag for bold is invalid and superseded by the “<strong>” tag.

Why should you as a designer validate your code?

The main reason designers should be strongly encouraged to check their code and use validation services like the W3C’s very own HTML validation tool for accessibility reasons.

With the arrival of Web browsers on tablet computers, smart mobile phones, games consoles and televisions it has become nearly impossible to predict just how your website will viewed. Any incorrect HTML can create an error in the browser or prevent your document from working in a particular browser. This will then turn any your audience.

For example, if you’re going to be running a social media campaign and planning on running a story on Digg and the majority of Digg users use Safari or Firefox. If your website fails to load correctly because of bad code or poor CSS formatting, your story is going to get no attention and you’ll be missing out on the potential of hundreds of organic editorial links.

Validated code is simply more predictable and makes life for Internet browsers and assistive technologies easier in order to present websites and their content in an accessible way.

Other reasons to validate your HTML code

Validation is a sign of professionalism

Today there is little certification for Web professionals beyond NVQ levels and computer and Information Technology related degrees. Many web designers so far have to learn by themselves. Seasoned designers can take pride in creating Web content using well-formed markup. Validation can then be used as a quick check to determine whether the code is the clean work of a seasoned HTML author, or quickly hacked-together tag soup. Validation therefore can set you as a designer apart from others and show you as the professional to hire.

Validation helps teach good practices.

Many professionals have been authoring the Web with HTML and CSS since the beginning and will know these technologies by heart. Beginners and students will find automated checking tools invaluable in spotting mistakes and make a good introduction to broader, more complex quality concepts such as accessibility.

Validation as a debugging tool

While many contemporary Web browsers do an increasingly good job of parsing even the worst HTML “tag soup”, some errors are not always found. Very often, different software on different platforms will not handle such errors so easily.

Using standard markup and style sheets offers a much greater chance of having your webpage and website handled consistently across all platforms and user-agents. Indeed, most developers creating Web applications know that reliable scripting needs the document to be parsed by User-Agents without any unexpected error, and will make sure that their markup and CSS is validated before creating a rich interactive layer.

Validation as a future-proof quality check

Checking that a page displays properly in several contemporary Web browsers may be a reasonable insurance that the page will work today, but it does not guarantee that it will work tomorrow. Internet browsers change and new versions appear all the time. Everyone who accessed the Web will use a different browser that is older or newer that your version.

Validation is one of the simplest ways to check whether a page is built in accordance with Web standards, and provides one of the most reliable guarantees that future Web platforms will handle it as designed.

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PSD to HTML Vs PSD to HTML5 – King of Conversion Market a Year Later

In the conversion market, everybody is talking about ongoing virtual battle between PSD to HTML conversion vs PSD to HTML5 conversion after the official launch of HTML5. Presently, there are thousands of service providers that offer PSD to HTML/ XHTML/ CSS conversion services at different price segments. Afterwards HTML5, the web development and conversion market has become more intense rivalry in comparison to the last year. It’s quite tough to predict who will be the next king of conversion market a year later among PSD to HTML vs PSD to HTML5.

Here, a tough comparison has been conducted between both on different parameters to find out our next king of conversion market. Before comparing the two, let’s get a brief introduction about both mark-up languages.

HTML5 vs HTML

The revised version of HTML – the HTML5 has becomes the new web standard. The standard revision of HyperText Markup Language, is a most standard programming language armed with complete makeover. Most of the web developers have already started on working with this newest specification of mark-up language for describing and structuring the contents and appearance of web pages in the World Wide Web. On the other hand, Hyper Text Markup Language is a complete predominant mark-up language well accepted by web developers as a basic building-block to structure and describe web pages of a site.

When comparing languages, an individual will find out various factors distinguishing both on different parameters which can be explored below:

  • In HyperText Markup Language, DOCTYPE is longer whereas DOCTYPE required to enable HTML5 documents standard mode.
  • Audio < audio > and < video > Video elements are available in HTML5 whereas no such features are available in HTML.
  • HTML5 supported by modern browser such as Firefox, Mozilla, Opera, Chrome, Safari whereas HTML only supports old browsers.

PSD to HTML vs PSD to HTML5 – King of conversion market a year later

Definitely the conversion market will become more mature in comparison to the past year but it’s really difficult to predict the future whether HTML5 is the end of PSD-to-HTML services or a fresh beginning of PSD-to-HTML5 services in the modern conversion market. However, one thing for sure true is that the scope of converting PSD-to-HTML will remain same or even increase more in the era of HTML5 when it comes to create modern web portals. This is because of the simple reason that the issues like unformatted and unstructured XHTML-CSS codes cannot be resolved by HTML5 backward compatibility and error handling ability.

The 5th major revision of the core language cannot underestimate the significant importance of PSD-to-XHTML. If paying attention towards real-world development needs of the language, one can say that there will be less demand for PSD to (X)HTML/ CSS conversion services. The reason is simple – the HTML5 brings few exciting new elements and attributes as well as updates already in use HyperText Markup Language code under its umbrella.The newest HyperText Markup Language specification comes with scripting application programming interfaces (APIs), Web Forms 2.0, another WHATWG specification, new “semantic” tags, error handling capability and backward compatibility etc.

HTML5 backed with interesting features and hereby, strongly influencing the PSD-to-HTML services. At this point, one can predict specific PSD to HTML5 conversion too. Whether PSD to HTML will be the next king of conversion market or PSD to HTML5 a year later among – time will show.

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HTML 5 and CSS 3: Future of Web Design

HTML 5 and CSS 3 are in the near future going to revolutionize the world of web design. In the near future the websites are going to be a combination of HTML 5 and CSS3. The expectations of the business from the websites are increasing, so much so that the businesses want the website to perform as efficient and effective business/sales representatives. It is because of this that the HTML 4 and the earlier versions of CSS are proving inefficient. Let us first know something about HTML 5 and then CSS 3.

HTML 5:

HTML 5 offers such coding that facilitates better incorporation of audio and video. It is also going to allow better user interface among the websites. Usually the HTML portrays the whole content of the website including the heading, titles and the content therein. HTML 4 that featured old coding style is now being replaced by HTML5. 1997 saw the launching of the HTML. In the early 90s the websites needed to just have the images and text content. HTML was the perfect coding language at that time. The world of internet and website has undergone a sea of change since then. The businesses now want the website to be interactive and media rich. This is where the limitations of HTML 4 come into play and the application of HTML 5 starts.

CSS 3:

CSS is the acronym of Cascading Style Sheets. It pertains to the look of the content when a visitor visits the website. The fonts, colors and the background play a crucial role in the look of the website. The CSS2, earlier version of CSS3 was good for the styles needed by the websites in the 1990s but not now. The restriction of CSS2 to a specific range of styles, fonts and effects limits the use of CSS2. As mentioned earlier the websites of today need to be made more appealing and interactive. The CSS3 has been designed to facilitate the website designer with tools to make the website visually more appealing and incorporate it with structurally more complex elements.

Effect of the combination of HTML 5 and CSS 3:

  • The visual effects will be made more appealing. With the help of HTML 5 and CSS 3 it is easier coding the websites to have drop shadows and round corners.
  • The Fonts can be customized.
  • The look of the tables can be enhanced by using better styles.
  • The designers are provided with Web Sockets. This allows faster transfer of online data and communication. Updates from the server can be got in real time.
  • HTML 5 and CSS 3 make new forms available to the website designers. This facilitates the designers with native functionality. The designers need to do less overall coding just because there is no need of scripting for validation.
  • Use of HTML 5 and CSS 3 allows better accesses information. The emails can be stored and later viewed offline.
  • Coding with HTML 5 and CSS 3 allows easy animation and transformation. The JavaScript used for writing simple animations can be written faster and this saves time.
  • The facility of Geo Location can also be incorporated.
  • HTML5 and CSS3 allow incorporating Canvas on to the website. Canvas is a native type of drawing functionality.

Web designing with the help of HTML5 and CSS3 makes the designer independent of plugins from third party. Usually these plugins pertain to video, audio or interactivity.

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Throwing a Birthday Party for Someone in the Hospital

When someone is in the hospital on their birthday, it can be a tough situation for the person. They may be feeling depressed or lonely when thinking about their upcoming birthday. Thankfully, there are many ways to bring cheer into this loved one’s life by throwing them a birthday party in their hospital room.

While it is tricky to throw a party in a hospital, it can be done with regard to the hospital’s rules and regulations. Before planning an event, it should be made clear how many people are allowed to attend and any other rules the hospital would like attendees to adhere to.

One of the easiest ways to brighten up the party atmosphere in a hospital room, it to have party guests bring in birthday balloons and flowers. These small gifts will make the birthday person feel special and more at home while in the hospital. If the hospital will allow it, it is also nice to post a birthday banner and some streamers. It is important to make sure the party is not intruding on another patient’s space.

The next order of business for throwing a birthday party in a hospital, is to get a cake. Generally, candles are not allowed in hospitals due to the flames and smoke. However, a beautiful cake is always welcomed. If possible, personalizing the cake is a great way to add flair to the cake.

To make the person feel extra special, shower them with birthday gifts. Since they are in the hospital, finding gifts that they can use while in the hospital are the most thoughtful. Some gifts to keep in mind are blankets, pillows, books, movies, music, or games they can play while in their hospital room. These gifts will show that everyone attending wants to make their stay at the hospital as comfortable as possible.

Making the party a surprise will add something special to the day for the person. For a surprise party, make sure to coordinate the event with the hospital personnel before the big day to ensure everything goes according to plan.

For loved ones in the hospital, a birthday can seem grim. It doesn’t have to be that way. All that is needed is a little planning and coordination with the hospital so they can have the birthday they deserve even under the circumstances. Throwing a birthday party for someone in the hospital will not only show them that they are being thought of while away from home but also brighten their special day.

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WYSIWYG Versus Coding: HTML With A Purpose

After years of working with entrepreneurs who developed their first web site using an image-based editor, the new world of internet marketing has placed a stronger emphasis on web development that conforms to technical concerns such as search engine optimization and multi-browser compatibility.

Wigging Out

WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get, pronounced “whizzy wig”) web site editing programs can allow anyone to develop rich, full-feature web sites without a working knowledge of HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). Many of these programs feature a “drag and drop” user interface, accomplishing eye-catching web site development in much the same way one might perform desktop publishing.

However, many, if not most of these programs generate HTML files that oftentimes results in compatibility issues. A few key concerns in developing web sites using WYSIWYG editors include:

* Text content may not be positioned at the top of the HTML file, which search engines like Google use to determine search engine ranking;

* Font sizes may not be fixed, displaying garbled or overlapping text;

* Content placement may not appear uniformly in less popular, yet fully functional browsers;

* Future expandability of your web site may be limited to the program’s design interface.

Although many WYSIWYG programs are capable of developing visually appealing web design, HTML automatically generated by the program for upload to the World Wide Web may limit your web site’s compatibility and expandability, long-term.

Coding by Hand

Coding HTML by hand can be a challenging, yet worthwhile endeavor, as the flexibility of hand-coded HTML measurably outweighs the time required to become familiar with the language.

Although a relatively simple programming language, HTML is a diverse subject with many facets that can be used to create a dynamic, rich web presence. There are a number of on-line tutorials offering basic and advanced HTML guidance, as well as HTML’s secondary offshoot languages, such as DHTML and XML. A search on Google (http://www.google.com) using terms such as “HTML how to” or “HTML tutorial” will produce a myriad of results for new and advanced programmers.

Coding your web site by hand not only allows for broadened aesthetic possibilities, but also provides greater flexibility for ensuring your site is optimized for search engine results and display compatibility.

Additional benefits of hand-coded HTML include:

* Wider range of design options such as of tables and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets)

* Faster page load, by reducing excess code generated by many WYSIWYG editors

* Increased compatibility with future expansion needs of your site, including forms, mini-applications (often referred to as scripts), and e-commerce features

On Second Thought

If the thought of developing your own web site sounds overwhelming, delegating the project to a third-party design firm may be the best choice. It’s okay to stay focused on what makes you money – supplying your products or services – and allow others to compliment your business with their expertise.

There are many local and national design firms that specialize in web design for particular needs, such as small business or organizational web sites. Hiring the right web design firm can bring your business to a whole new level; be sure to perform thorough research, and compare service providers before choosing the right design partner for your business or organization.

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Hypnosis, the Naked Truth and Steve Jobs

My immediate response to the success story of the late Steve Jobs was how exactly do you define what constitutes a success story? A success story can vary dramatically from one person to another.

For example some people consider finding a job and supporting a family to be their success story, while some people may feel that if they heal from a traumatic event or a terrible accident, then they are success story. So being a success story really depends on the point of view of the individual concerned.

This brings me to Steve Jobs (RIP), as Apple said: “Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Those of us who have been fortunate enough to know, and work with Steve have lost a dear friend, and an inspiring mentor. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple.”

True, Steve Jobs was a genius, and he had a massive influence on global markets as well as billions of lives. And as we all know now, there was more to Steve job’s personal life than anyone of us could have known.

When he was 17, Jobs read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” This quote made a truly profound impression on him, and since then, for the past 33 years or so, he looked in the mirror daily, asking himself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer had been “No” for too many days in a row, he knew he had to change something.

Telling himself that he’d be dead soon is the most important tool he could think of to help him make all the big choices in his life. Because almost everything; external expectations, pride, fear, embarrassment or failure fall away in the face of death, leaving behind only what is truly important. Remembering that he would die was going to be the best way he knew to avoid the trap of thinking he had something to lose. As he said, you are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

But did he truly follow his heart? Or was he simply suppressing negative emotional feelings deep inside not wanting to deal with them, and as a result he became very ill.

As a hypnotherapist I understand only to well the power of mind body connection. I have to wonder, would it have been possible if he did learn how to deal with his negative emotions, to forgive the people who gave him up for adoption, would our Steve Jobs still be alive today?

I have no doubts. Research has shown clear evidence that stress, anxiety, fear, anger, emotional problems or comfort eating etc, are the biggest trigger to most illnesses. Subconscious self-sabotaging is highly dangerous and can prove fatal!

Think about how many people you know who died of cancer or other serious illnesses?

The disease is created mainly by anger, and rage, vehemently eating us inside. We are all of us familiar with the proverbial saying, “what’s eating you up?”

Cancer is one of the main causes of death in the U.S. Pancreatic, stomach, liver, colon, and lung cancers being among the most prevalent.

Cancers thrive in toxic environments so the real issue for dealing with cancer now is to understand that our anger, depression, suppressed emotions etc can create the kind of toxic acidic blood chemistry in which cancer will flourish. In comparison an alkaline environment will suppress the spread of cancer, and we create that environment based on what we eat, what we think and what we feel. It is literally how badly or how well we treat our bodies.

So how do we create the perfect environment to attack the cancer?

Clearly what we need to do is to start looking after ourselves, cultivating good habits, good eating, and wholesome thinking. As the corner pin to aid us in all these areas we utilize the three H’s:

* Hypnosis

* Hypnosis

* Hypnosis

My heart goes out to all those who loved Steve Jobs. We will never really know if by promoting good mental and physical health he would still be with us but by adopting the right attitude in our own daily lives and looking after our bodies we might strive to keep cancers and other toxic inspired illnesses at bay.

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